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G.1.1 Complex Types

Static Semantics

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The generic library package Numerics.Generic_Complex_Types has the following declaration:
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generic
   type Real is digits <>;
package Ada.Numerics.Generic_Complex_Types is
   pragma Pure(Generic_Complex_Types);
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   type Complex is
      record
         Re, Im : Real'Base;
      end record;
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   type Imaginary is private;
   pragma Preelaborable_Initialization(Imaginary);
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   i : constant Imaginary;
   j : constant Imaginary;
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   function Re (X : Complex)   return Real'Base;
   function Im (X : Complex)   return Real'Base;
   function Im (X : Imaginary) return Real'Base;
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   procedure Set_Re (X  : in out Complex;
                     Re : in     Real'Base);
   procedure Set_Im (X  : in out Complex;
                     Im : in     Real'Base);
   procedure Set_Im (X  :    out Imaginary;
                     Im : in     Real'Base);
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   function Compose_From_Cartesian (Re, Im : Real'Base) return Complex;
   function Compose_From_Cartesian (Re     : Real'Base) return Complex;
   function Compose_From_Cartesian (Im     : Imaginary) return Complex;
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   function Modulus (X     : Complex) return Real'Base;
   function "abs"   (Right : Complex) return Real'Base renames Modulus;
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   function Argument (X     : Complex)   return Real'Base;
   function Argument (X     : Complex;
                      Cycle : Real'Base) return Real'Base;
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   function Compose_From_Polar (Modulus, Argument        : Real'Base)
      return Complex;
   function Compose_From_Polar (Modulus, Argument, Cycle : Real'Base)
      return Complex;
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   function "+"       (Right : Complex) return Complex;
   function "-"       (Right : Complex) return Complex;
   function Conjugate (X     : Complex) return Complex;
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   function "+" (Left, Right : Complex) return Complex;
   function "-" (Left, Right : Complex) return Complex;
   function "*" (Left, Right : Complex) return Complex;
   function "/" (Left, Right : Complex) return Complex;
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   function "**" (Left : Complex; Right : Integer) return Complex;
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   function "+"       (Right : Imaginary) return Imaginary;
   function "-"       (Right : Imaginary) return Imaginary;
   function Conjugate (X     : Imaginary) return Imaginary renames "-";
   function "abs"     (Right : Imaginary) return Real'Base;
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   function "+" (Left, Right : Imaginary) return Imaginary;
   function "-" (Left, Right : Imaginary) return Imaginary;
   function "*" (Left, Right : Imaginary) return Real'Base;
   function "/" (Left, Right : Imaginary) return Real'Base;
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   function "**" (Left : Imaginary; Right : Integer) return Complex;
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   function "<"  (Left, Right : Imaginary) return Boolean;
   function "<=" (Left, Right : Imaginary) return Boolean;
   function ">"  (Left, Right : Imaginary) return Boolean;
   function ">=" (Left, Right : Imaginary) return Boolean;
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   function "+" (Left : Complex;   Right : Real'Base) return Complex;
   function "+" (Left : Real'Base; Right : Complex)   return Complex;
   function "-" (Left : Complex;   Right : Real'Base) return Complex;
   function "-" (Left : Real'Base; Right : Complex)   return Complex;
   function "*" (Left : Complex;   Right : Real'Base) return Complex;
   function "*" (Left : Real'Base; Right : Complex)   return Complex;
   function "/" (Left : Complex;   Right : Real'Base) return Complex;
   function "/" (Left : Real'Base; Right : Complex)   return Complex;
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   function "+" (Left : Complex;   Right : Imaginary) return Complex;
   function "+" (Left : Imaginary; Right : Complex)   return Complex;
   function "-" (Left : Complex;   Right : Imaginary) return Complex;
   function "-" (Left : Imaginary; Right : Complex)   return Complex;
   function "*" (Left : Complex;   Right : Imaginary) return Complex;
   function "*" (Left : Imaginary; Right : Complex)   return Complex;
   function "/" (Left : Complex;   Right : Imaginary) return Complex;
   function "/" (Left : Imaginary; Right : Complex)   return Complex;
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   function "+" (Left : Imaginary; Right : Real'Base) return Complex;
   function "+" (Left : Real'Base; Right : Imaginary) return Complex;
   function "-" (Left : Imaginary; Right : Real'Base) return Complex;
   function "-" (Left : Real'Base; Right : Imaginary) return Complex;
   function "*" (Left : Imaginary; Right : Real'Base) return Imaginary;
   function "*" (Left : Real'Base; Right : Imaginary) return Imaginary;
   function "/" (Left : Imaginary; Right : Real'Base) return Imaginary;
   function "/" (Left : Real'Base; Right : Imaginary) return Imaginary;
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private
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   type Imaginary is new Real'Base;
   i : constant Imaginary := 1.0;
   j : constant Imaginary := 1.0;
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end Ada.Numerics.Generic_Complex_Types;
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 The library package Numerics.Complex_Types is declared pure and defines the same types, constants, and subprograms as Numerics.Generic_Complex_Types, except that the predefined type Float is systematically substituted for Real'Base throughout. Nongeneric equivalents of Numerics.Generic_Complex_Types for each of the other predefined floating point types are defined similarly, with the names Numerics.Short_Complex_Types, Numerics.Long_Complex_Types, etc. 
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 Complex is a visible type with Cartesian components.
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Imaginary is a private type; its full type is derived from Real'Base. 
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The arithmetic operations and the Re, Im, Modulus, Argument, and Conjugate functions have their usual mathematical meanings. When applied to a parameter of pure-imaginary type, the “imaginary-part” function Im yields the value of its parameter, as the corresponding real value. The remaining subprograms have the following meanings: 
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When the Cycle parameter is specified, the result of the Argument function and the parameter Argument of the Compose_From_Polar function are measured in units such that a full cycle of revolution has the given value; otherwise, they are measured in radians.
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The computed results of the mathematically multivalued functions are rendered single-valued by the following conventions, which are meant to imply the principal branch: 
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Dynamic Semantics

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The exception Numerics.Argument_Error is raised by the Argument and Compose_From_Polar functions with specified cycle, signaling a parameter value outside the domain of the corresponding mathematical function, when the value of the parameter Cycle is zero or negative.
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The exception Constraint_Error is raised by the division operator when the value of the right operand is zero, and by the exponentiation operator when the value of the left operand is zero and the value of the exponent is negative, provided that Real'Machine_Overflows is True; when Real'Machine_Overflows is False, the result is unspecified. Constraint_Error can also be raised when a finite result overflows (see G.2.6).

Implementation Requirements

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In the implementation of Numerics.Generic_Complex_Types, the range of intermediate values allowed during the calculation of a final result shall not be affected by any range constraint of the subtype Real. 
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In the following cases, evaluation of a complex arithmetic operation shall yield the prescribed result, provided that the preceding rules do not call for an exception to be raised: 
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When the result, or a result component, of any operator of Numerics.Generic_Complex_Types has a mathematical definition in terms of a single arithmetic or relational operation, that result or result component exhibits the accuracy of the corresponding operation of the type Real.
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Other accuracy requirements for the Modulus, Argument, and Compose_From_Polar functions, and accuracy requirements for the multiplication of a pair of complex operands or for division by a complex operand, all of which apply only in the strict mode, are given in G.2.6.
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The sign of a zero result or zero result component yielded by a complex arithmetic operation or function is implementation defined when Real'Signed_Zeros is True. 

Implementation Permissions

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The nongeneric equivalent packages may, but need not, be actual instantiations of the generic package for the appropriate predefined type.
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 Implementations may obtain the result of exponentiation of a complex or pure-imaginary operand by repeated complex multiplication, with arbitrary association of the factors and with a possible final complex reciprocation (when the exponent is negative). Implementations are also permitted to obtain the result of exponentiation of a complex operand, but not of a pure-imaginary operand, by converting the left operand to a polar representation; exponentiating the modulus by the given exponent; multiplying the argument by the given exponent; and reconverting to a Cartesian representation. Because of this implementation freedom, no accuracy requirement is imposed on complex exponentiation (except for the prescribed results given above, which apply regardless of the implementation method chosen). 

Implementation Advice

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Because the usual mathematical meaning of multiplication of a complex operand and a real operand is that of the scaling of both components of the former by the latter, an implementation should not perform this operation by first promoting the real operand to complex type and then performing a full complex multiplication. In systems that, in the future, support an Ada binding to IEC 559:1989, the latter technique will not generate the required result when one of the components of the complex operand is infinite. (Explicit multiplication of the infinite component by the zero component obtained during promotion yields a NaN that propagates into the final result.) Analogous advice applies in the case of multiplication of a complex operand and a pure-imaginary operand, and in the case of division of a complex operand by a real or pure-imaginary operand. 
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Likewise, because the usual mathematical meaning of addition of a complex operand and a real operand is that the imaginary operand remains unchanged, an implementation should not perform this operation by first promoting the real operand to complex type and then performing a full complex addition. In implementations in which the Signed_Zeros attribute of the component type is True (and which therefore conform to IEC 559:1989 in regard to the handling of the sign of zero in predefined arithmetic operations), the latter technique will not generate the required result when the imaginary component of the complex operand is a negatively signed zero. (Explicit addition of the negative zero to the zero obtained during promotion yields a positive zero.) Analogous advice applies in the case of addition of a complex operand and a pure-imaginary operand, and in the case of subtraction of a complex operand and a real or pure-imaginary operand.
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Implementations in which Real'Signed_Zeros is True should attempt to provide a rational treatment of the signs of zero results and result components. As one example, the result of the Argument function should have the sign of the imaginary component of the parameter X when the point represented by that parameter lies on the positive real axis; as another, the sign of the imaginary component of the Compose_From_Polar function should be the same as (resp., the opposite of) that of the Argument parameter when that parameter has a value of zero and the Modulus parameter has a nonnegative (resp., negative) value. 

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